MindHacks image - CharcotDr Vaughan Bell, posting at the ever-stimulating MindHacks.com, has written an interesting piece about the neuroscience of hypnosis and suggestion, and how these are helping us to understand hysterical/conversion disorders.

"Contrary to the popular myth, if you are experiences the effects of suggestion, your mind isn’t ‘under control’ and it’s much like watching a film. You can choose to turn away at any point but you don’t decide to be scared or amused by the movie – it just happens. Highly suggestible people can allow suggestions of paralysis, amnesia or even hallucinations."

There are some great links to a JNNP podcast with hypnosis researcher Quinton Deeley, as well as to a Guardian article Vaughan wrote about the neuroscience of suggestion.

 

Home
About & contact
News

Language
English
Francais
Information
What is hypnosis?
Definitions of hypnosis
Types of suggestion
FAQ
Scientific theories of hypnosis
History of hypnosis
Animal hypnosis
Key people in hypnosis
Demand characteristics
Research
Scientific research
States of consciousness
Neuroscience
Modification of suggestibility
Attention and hypnosis
Pain research
Hypnosis as a research tool
Genes and hypnotizability
Hypnotherapy
What is hypnotherapy?
Is it effective?
Finding a therapist
Depression
Irritable bowel syndrome
Pain
PTSD
Smoking
Surgery
Weight loss
Resources
Hypnosis research papers
Suggestibility scales
Scripts
Videos
Forum
Organisations
Journals
Book reviews

© 2007-2017 Dr Matthew Whalley