Genes and hypnosis

DNA Image by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:ZephyrisA number of studies have explored the link between genes and hypnotisability.

 

Lichtenberg, P., Bachner-Melman, R., Gritsenko, I., Ebste, R. P. (2005). Exploratory association study between catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) high/low enzyme activity polymorphism and hypnotizability. American Journal of Medical Genetics, 96(6), 771-774.

Ott, U., Reuter, M., Hennig, J., Vaitl, D. (2005). Evidence for a common biological basis of the absorption trait, hallucinogen effects, and positive symptoms: Epistasis between 5-HT2a and COMT polymorphisms. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 137B(1), 29-32.

Szekely A, Kovacs-Nagy R, Bányai EI, Gosi-Greguss AC, Varga K, Halmai Z, Ronai Z, Sasvari-Szekely M. (2010). Association between hypnotizability and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphism. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 58(3), 301-15.

 

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